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OAKFORD WEATHER

Nine Oaks Angling Centre

Tench Fishing at Nine Oaks


Nine Oaks has 3 Coarse lakes, with Tench in the Main Lake and House Pool. Our largest recorded Tench has been one of 5lb from the House pool.

Many small Tench were stocked during late autumn 2011 and again autumn 2017, and have grown on nicely since then.

Tench have been caught, at Nine Oaks, from as early as January, with spring, i.e the warmer months through autumn being the best time. Tench generally hug the bottom, around reeds and under or close to Lilly pads, with Sweetcorn and Worm baits being good all-round baits at most times of the year. Maggots, while being an excellent bait, will generally provide the Roach and non-carp species. We do not have huge numbers of Tench, consequently they are not caught here regularly.

While we don’t have the biggest Tench we do have some lovely golden/light green olive examples that give a really good fight for their size.

Tench bites are usually a couple of knocks or small lifts of the float (a lift bite where the float rises) then it slides away slowly under the water. Be patient and wait for the bite to develop fully when the float disappears completely then strike. With a big tail Tench are hard-fighting fish and good tackle is advised.

Baits for catching Tench:

A baits list is endless but well known to catch tench are worms, lob worms, redworms sweetcorn, bread (large piece of flake seems best but can also be caught on either punch, flake and paste), maggots (Red seems best), casters, pinkies, mini-boilies, pellets, prawns, cockles and mussels (not those pickled in vinegar).

As with all fishing, if you are not catching then make a small change, move the float up or down a little, or change method or bait and try another. Do not be afraid to try something different and keep trying.

Tip:

When using maggots mixed in your ground-bait, add a few dead ones too as these will not bury themselves in the mud.

The village of Oakford in the County of Ceredigion (where we are located) is generally mild and Tench can be caught all year here - including January and November! In November 2008, 3 Tench up to 3lbs in weight were caught in the House pool on Sweetcorn.

Best baits: Sweetcorn, pellet, worm and maggots.

General fishing methods for catching Tench:

Tench respond very well to ground baiting so start by laying down a bed of ground-bait using brown crumb or continental ground-bait with sweetcorn, casters, chopped up worms and some of your hook bait mixed in. Other combinations can also be used for ground-bait; hemp, particles and small pellets are a good choice. Tench seem to prefer a sweet bait and some anglers add molasses, a sweet syrup, to their ground-bait or other sweet tasting additives. This is not a hard and fast rule though; if you want to try savoury or spicy baits there is nothing stopping you.

As in Match Fishing, keep feeding often and lightly to keep their interest.

Note:

When you have caught a tench, as with all fish, handle it carefully. DO NOT use a towel, cloth or anything similar to hold the fish. We recommend handling the fish by NOT picking it up but by keeping it in your net and putting your hand under the landing net and then using the wet net to hold it with. This is the safest way, if it flip-flops it is still in the net and not on the ground. Plus a wet net also helps in keeping your warm hands away from it! The net helps to control the fish too. When you're done, just slip the net into the water, turn it over and lift, allowing the fish to swim away untouched by human hands!

Nine Oaks' Tench Tench respond very well to ground baiting so start by laying down a bed of ground-bait using brown crumb or continental ground-bait with sweetcorn, casters, chopped up worms and some of your hook bait mixed in. Other combinations can also be used for ground-bait; hemp, particles and small pellets are a good choice.

Tench seem to prefer a sweet bait and some anglers add molasses, a sweet syrup, to their ground-bait or other sweet tasting additives. This is not a hard and fast rule though; if you want to try savoury or spicy baits there is nothing stopping you.

As in Match Fishing, keep feeding often and lightly to keep their interest

Tench bites are usually a couple of knocks or small lifts of the float (a lift bite where the float rises) then it slides away slowly under the water.

Be patient and wait for the bite to develop fully when the float disappears completely then strike. With a big tail Tench are hard-fighting fish and good tackle is advised.

A baits list is endless but well known to catch tench are worms, lob worms, redworms, pellet, sweetcorn, bread (large piece of flake seems best but can also be caught on either punch, flake and paste), maggots (Red seems best), casters, pinkies, mini-boilies, pellets, prawns, cockles and mussels (not those pickled in vinegar).

As with all fishing, if you are not catching then make a small change, move the float up or down a little, or change method or bait and try another. Do not be afraid to try something different and keep trying.

When you have caught a tench, as with all fish, handle it carefully. DO NOT use a towel, cloth or anything similar to hold the fish. We recommend holding the fish by putting your hand under the landing net and using the wet net to hold it with.

This is the safest way, if it flip-flops it is still in the net and not on the ground. Plus a wet net also helps in keeping your warm hands away from it!

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